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Sustainable Chains of Production and Consumption

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Analysis and strategy statements on these thematic areas were elaborated in the first draft of the Annual Plan 2005-2006, as result of consultations of stakeholders in a series of workshops held in Thimphu, Bhutan, November 2005.

The International Work Programme on Changing Consumption and Production Patterns, adopted by the Commission on Sustainable Development of the UN, assesses the impact of changes in consumption and production in developed countries on developing countries. Changes in consumption and production patterns result from a choice of a wide variety of actors including business and industry, households and governments. Challenges faced by the partner countries include changing consumption and production patterns, and stimulating as well as facilitating trends towards more sustainable patterns.

In an increasing way, huge and transnational supermarket chains tend to set the rules of the game for market access for agricultural and food products, organic products included. Investments of supermarket chains in developing countries have led to globalisation trends of domestic markets that tend to exclude small farmers. Alone, they are not capable of competing with agro-industry or imported products. Fair trade markets are too small as to produce impact on rural development.

› Benin, Bhutan, Costa Rica

Analysis and strategy statements on these thematic areas were elaborated in the first draft of the Annual Plan 2005-2006, as result of consultations of stakeholders in a series of workshops held in Thimphu, Bhutan, November 2005.

Bhutan, Benin and Costa Rica share patterns of constraints related to the generation of income and increasing employment through sustainable supply chains. Rural production systems are either geared towards self-sufficiency or focus on environmentally unfriendly commodity production. Polices to specifically promote sustainable production initiatives are scarce. Producer organisations often lack the human capacities and organisational strengths to adequately support producers in their quest for more sustainable production systems and markets for their products. Export of products to Europe is frequently hampered by high quality standards, regulations and import restrictions.

  • Costa Rica has gained experience with the production, commercialisation and certification of organically grown products and their export to Europe.
  • In Bhutan, a wide range of knowledge and experience exists on the organic production of medicinal and aromatic plants.
  • In Benin, various organisations have developed experience with the cultivation of and trade in organic cotton and cashew nuts.

› Immediate PSSC Objective 2

Contribute to the construction of sustainable and competitive demand-led supply chains in Benin, Bhutan and Costa Rica: by means of strengthening productive and commercial capacities of farmers and producer organisations; adoption of sanitary, phytosanitary and quality standards; enhancement of labour productivity, yields (output) and efficiency; sound management of natural resources and waste; and promoting their articulation with promising market actors.

› Expected results

  • A series of innovative projects implemented at micro-level, for produce and technology development, conducive towards more sustainable production systems and certification.
  • Strengthened producers organisations or associations, with entrepreneurial spirit.
  • At least one or two promising production supply chains in each country count with a strategic development plan or business development plan, and are functioning.
  • Multi-stakeholder dialogue involving the public sector has led to improvements in public policy support for sustainable production chains (such as regulatory frameworks, incentive instruments, orientation of agricultural research).